Most people have never been in a car accident. Even fewer have been hurt in one, and even less have been in a severe wreck with major injuries. That’s good.

But that can make it hard to pick a good lawyer you can trust if you have been hurt in a car wreck. Everyone you know can tell you about a good restaurant, hardware store, or movie theater. But not many people have personal experience with lawyers.

What do you need to know to pick a good lawyer?  Here are some tips:

  1. Be careful if they are SUPER-excited to sign up your case: some lawyers will sign any case to make a fee, even if it’s not in the client’s best interests;
  2. Be careful if they don’t have an office or a network of lawyers in the state where you were hurt: the laws of that state will control what happens in your case;
  3. Ask if they have tried cases in front of juries: if not, insurance adjusters simply won’t take them as seriously as they do lawyers that try cases;
  4. Ask if they’ve been rated by their peers or judges for their legal ability and honesty; if not, they probably haven’t been around very long, and may not have the experience you need.

At the Miller Law Group, we ONLY sign up cases if we think we can help you do better with us than without us. We have offices in North Carolina, South Carolina, Washington, D.C., and networks of other lawyers across the U.S. and internationally to help us navigate the laws in other jurisdictions. Our senior lawyers combine for over 50 years’ experience and over 100 jury trials.  Both Stacy Miller and Sean Cole are rated as “Preeminent” for both legal ability and ethical standards by other lawyers and judges.

If you need help, we’re here for you. Even if we don’t take your case, we’ll try to point you in the right direction to get other help or do handle the matter yourself.  Contact us here or call 919-348-4361.  We’ve got the experience. We’ve got integrity. We’ve got your back.

 

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